Friday, 5 September 2014

The 6 Month Mountain Reduction & Painting Challenge

I recently agreed to take part in the 6 month mountain reduction and painting challenge set by Chris, from Chris' miniature woes blog.
As I'm sure most readers know, Mountain in this case is nerd slang meaning pile of unpainted miniatures... Or "lead mountain" although that term is less than accurate in modern times.

There are a couple of caveats for me.. The main one being that my "mountain" is mostly back in Sydney awaiting sea-freight. It's unlikely I'll see it until next year. 
Do not fear though, I still have at least a hill of unpainted figures with me, not to mention an entire Vampire-level pledge of Reaper plastics still in the box. I'm a little bit on the fence about what to do with that lot though. Do I break scale? I fear what might happen.

So in the spirit of the challenge my first post is here (and on instagram), with a bold experiment in frugality and hobby science.


Coffee basing paste

I have used my old coffee grounds as ground cover in the past with reasonable success, although I just sprinkled it over wet PVA glue at the time.
As I have run out of texture gel for basing my figures and am trying to be frugal, I splurged £2 on a small bottle of glue from the newsagent and mixed it undiluted with dry coffee grounds until it became a thick paste. I enjoy good quality hobby products as much as the next nerd, but I love finding ways to build things for free, or in this case, out of literal garbage.

I applied it to the bases of some Space Templars and Prang that I've been keen to paint. Lovely figures sculpted by the talented Eli Arndt, and sold by 15mm.co.uk ... But with quite thick cast bases. How will it work? Will I get some paint on a mini before Mik? Only time will tell.

13 comments:

  1. Modeling is in your blood, Jacker. Whatever you do will be very good! I cast a nudge in the direction of painting the Prang1st.

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    1. Thank you very much Jay! Your nudge just put the Prang at the front of the queue :)

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  2. An interesting idea, may have to try it! Also, welcome to the blog o sphere side of the challenge!

    Irishjaeger

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    1. Thank you! I throw out several pucks of used coffee grounds every day. It makes greta ground cover because it varied from dust size to small rock size. It seems to have set very well, so time to get painting!

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  3. Dude, I'm going to totally get paint on a mini before you. I plan on picking up a brush is less than a week to ten days!

    You said 'newsagent'.

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    1. I'm undercoating my Prang after lunch, so you better hurry!
      What do you call a small local newspaper and sundries store? A five and dime?
      Prang means vehicular accident in Australian.

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    2. We call those 'convenient stores'. Or sometimes just 'drug stores'.

      Nice to see you double dipping here and on IG.

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    3. We have newsagents, convenience stores and corner shops. It's a hybrid culture. In the UK we have convenience stores and off-licences.

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  4. You got my attention with 2 things; "hobby science" and "to build things (...) out of literal garbage".

    Wife knows well I love that.

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    1. Then you will be pleased to know it worked well ;) I didn't get to paint all weekend, hopefully today will be better.

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  6. Do you not end up with Coffee smelling models?

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  7. I took your concept here of using coffee grounds and mixed it into some cheap acrylic burnt umber colored paint (craft store type). I just put some grounds into a dab of paint on my pallet, and just painted my bases with it. I liked the effect immensely. Coffee is light weight, and makes for a bigger, more natural looking, larger rocks on 15mm bases. Mixing it with the paint gave me a more spread out area between 'rocks' on the bases than the PVA mix. Worth experimenting with. Now, I'll report back once I've played them on a table and seen how durable that method is.

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