Saturday, 30 August 2014

5 Parsecs continues

The Spaceport at game start.
Campaign turn 2.
After an uncomfortable beginning, Dash, Toros and Mackie all head into town looking for a Patron (Sending 3 crew members is an auto-success with this task).
Jella manages to get a good deal on an auto rifle at the markets, while T92 guards the ship again.

The explorer Jann Silman is holed up in his ship at the spaceport. He has an unmarked crate of goods he is unwilling to leave behind, but a group of Vespulid pirates bar the way.

I rolled 5 opponents, one a leader. They were Orange Aliens, with claws/fangs and hive mind talents... I chose my vespulid figures to represent them. This meant they were all armed with handguns, the leader with 2.

The delivery mission called for the crew to carry something to the other side of the board. As I wanted to use my interior modular scenery, I started my crew in one corner and rolled random module placement for the Vespulids by rolling a d4 for each one.

The crate would be represented by a crate model from GZG, and I ruled it could be carried 4" per turn (the speed a figure can carry a wounded comrade in the game) by one figure, or 6" per turn if carried by 2 cooperating figures. Dashing while carrying the crate is not permitted.

Final turns of the game
Dash and Jella grudgingly teamed up on point. A single Vespulid eluded their fire and tore Dash up in close combat. (+1 to brawl for claws is actually pretty deadly, especially when charging.) Before she could react, the alien followed up 2" and quickly dispatched Jella as well.

Mackie and Tommy 92 moved up with the crate, Tommy's shotgun making quick work of the blood splattered Vespulid. Toros used the suppressive fire mode of his assault carbine to send all the Vespulids on his flank scurrying for cover. 3 shock dice really lays down a withering hail of fire that usually results in at least a Flinch.

Another couple of Scurry turns got Mackie and T92 all the way to Bar Gyro unharmed. Toros plodded along covering their rear and laying down a lot of (Cyril Figgis-style) SUPPRESSIVE FIIIIIRRRE.

A final Fire Fight turn saw T92 flinch and dive behind some tables, leaving Mackie to crawl to the exit, pushing the crate along the floor. Success!

The butcher's bill
Aftermath
After rolling up a loot item and a trade item (Patron missions grant a trade item as a bonus) I rolled for Dash and Jella's injuries. Dash died and Jella suffered a career ending injury. Was it really internal bleeding, or was it remorse for never making up with Dash before he died saving her life? A sad end to an outlaw artist's tale.

Next episode, Toros' enemies, the UNITY enforcers will be attacking the crew. It's an Assault mission, which I think I'll do on board their ship, the Rampart. Exciting!

Notes
This game took place on a board only 18" square. The terrain is custom built using 6" MDF squares as bases, 6mm cork tile walls and cardboard panels for floor detail. It was originally going to be an office for cyberpunk-ish games, but watching the 2012 Dredd movie made me want to turn it into a Mega block. It's fairly generic, so works (possibly better) as a spaceport too.
I spent a lot of time planning it, going as far as to build a 3d prototype in Google sketchup to test out if revolving the modules would make an interesting enough variety of setups. As there are only 4 basic room types, each one only having 2 walls (for ease of moving figures) the build was very easy, cheap materials and straight cuts.
(Through my adventures in terrain building, I have decided that fully enclosed interior walls or too-high interior walls are the bane of 15mm gaming. If you cant easily see or get at the minis, it's no good.)

Interestingly, the even smaller than normal spaces worked fine due to the density of cover. FiveCore has a slightly unusual cover mechanic which allows a figure to "Hide" or "Peek" when entering cover or activating subsequently. Hiding figures cannot shoot or be shot at , while peeking figures can. Peeking figures are better off vs shock dice than one in the open, but otherwise quite vulnerable. Hidden figures are for the most part totally safe. I find this a really refreshing way to handle cover, but also really fun, as it adds an interesting decision to taking cover each time. My advice is the more terrain the better... Avoid just plunking down a few pieces if you want an interesting game!

House Rules
I have been using 6"+1d6" as a Bail distance instead of the stated 12". I like this for smaller game areas as it adds a small element of uncertainly when a figure runs away.  It's also the same as a Dash move, only involuntary.

That's all for today, keep your blaster handy... You never know what's around the corner on the Fringe!

21 comments:

  1. Love this campaign - I've been waiting all week! What happened to the snazzy episode summary - too much fiddling with word?

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    1. Just too much effort. Blow-by-blow battle reports sap all the fun out of it for me so I think recaps are much more likely to result in a post. Ditto exporting and uploading my summary sheet.

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  2. Loving the campaign so far, looks a great game system, I've bought Five Core, the 3 supplement bundle and Five Parsec from home on your recommendation. Looking forward to starting up a campaign myself.

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    1. It's very very fast once you get the hang of it, plus throws up lots of surprises and twists so its excellent for soloing. Excellent motivation to paint etc too. I'm painting one of my new replacement crew members right now!

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  3. Great report, and I'm digging the modular scenery.

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    1. Cheers Barks! I'm reasonably happy with it. As always, as soon as it was done I'd had a ton of ideas of how to do it better next time :/

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  4. Ahhh, my comment was eaten.

    Great reference to Cyril.

    I'd love to see some more pics of your terrain tiles, seperated a bit. It looks fantastic.
    Also, did you purchase or scratch build the tables/chairs and bench? (In red, near the green floored bar)

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    1. I love Archer :) I'll take some quick shots of the modules for the next post. The little chairs are railway models, but the tables and food are scratch built. The sofa is metal, from Khurasan.

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  5. That terrain setup reminds me a lot of the old Space Crusade board game. Very cool. How big is that?

    Always wanted to do indoors battles, but we usually just sketch out a floor plan since we rarely want the same setup each time. Your modular approach solves that quite nicely and I guess you can always add more modules whenever you feel like.

    Too bad you lost two but that's life (and death) on the Fringes :) Might need to do some recruiting next turn.

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    1. Each module is 6" square, this layout is 18" square total. The walls are 1" high. I'm thinking of ways to do some mass-produced versions with more detail.

      I've already played episode 3, report soon!

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  6. Nice terrain.
    I totally agree with not having too many walls. Our Pathfinder GM bought into the Dwarven Forge Kickstarter and, while the stuff looks great... it's a bit of bitch to play on. Hard to see where everything is at while sitting down and uber-fiddly for movement and positioning.
    Your setup looks much more doable... I'd love to build something similar for our games of Gruntz.

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    1. Thanks! No more than 2 walls per room works very nicely. Thinking of the layout more like a stage play set than a model building helps a lot.

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  7. Great game report! And the scenery is perfectly designed for close-in run-fun-fighting!

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    1. Thanks Jay! I'm keen to take the scenery idea further :)

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  8. As usually brilliantly design. Please forgive me my boldness, but would You be so kind and let us download those files for Google sketchup, so all of us with poor design-fu (architectually impaired) could try to ineptly reproduce Your wonderful worlds? :)

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    1. Thank you kindly Umpapa! I no longer have the files, I deleted them when I built the modules. You should be able to replicate the modules form the photos in my next post. Each floor is 6"x6", and the walls are 1" high.

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  9. Another Great AAR, to bad Dash and Jella will not be able make up now.

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    1. So tragic! A reminder to live in the now. ;) Great narrative generated in-game, m favorite part of the rules.

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  10. Hi!

    Really love the tiny board you've constructed! I may have to steal the idea for my own projects and its great to see you re-inspired for 15mm scale!

    All the best!

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    1. Cheers SCS! You will have no trouble I'm sure. The only fiddly part was cutting the floor panels out of cereal pack with a straightedge and x-acto. And that was pretty fast too. Cork walls mean you can use superglue to hold it all together, a very speedy build.

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  11. Can I request Bar Gyro has a sexy-chubby bearded owner with a bad ass gun that might get into a cameo adventure spot?

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