Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Scratch Building



This is what I did last night. Its is an example of what can be achieved with the following materials:

Art board (thick card)
Foam Sheet (Like what's in the middle of foam core board. From the art store.)
X-acto Knife (with fresh blade)
Steel straightedge
Cutting mat
Tacky glue.

The concept is a Chinese restaurant or tea house. This is because I love John Woo movies. It is a single-storey building with a flat roof, multiple entry/exit points and plenty of space to move figures about. The model is built on one of my handmade "pavement" tiles for placement on a large road surface mat.

Tacky glue was used because it dries faster. You could use PVA just as well, but you might have to pin or clamp the walls while it dries.

There is nothing difficult here, just a lot of straight cuts. There was also no real plan when I started, it just developed as it was put together. Sure it took an evening to make, but I look at that as an evening of entertainment in front of the TV rather than a chore. It was also very very cheap.

Planned next is some extra detail here and there, including the kitchen piece from Khurasan's Noodle shop model and some low cover on the roof to make it a bit more interesting. Because Foam board has been used for the walls, it will be easy to scribe in some detail as well.

Thanks for looking!

12 comments:

  1. Damn, i just bought paper mache boxes to start making urban terrain boards, and i was thinking "i have all this artboard and thick card, i should make some big buildings with interiors to impress the guys. but first lemme look around blogger for some inspiration!" It seems you read my mind. Awesome tea-noodle shop!

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    1. With a little bit of patience, you can build up quite complex stuff with just layers of thick card. I would suggest getting hold of some corrugated paper too.. It has so many uses for garage doors, roofing etc. Good luck with your project!

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  2. I like the way you are using a base to both give stability to the piece and provide an instant sidewalk/pavement. I need to figure out how I want to do this for my Victorian London buildings.

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    1. I wish I thought of this prior to my 'modular' road/street tiles (which are no longer being used) as I have pledged never to have visible seams on my table again! I'm also pretty sure this will make them easy to store/pack.

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  3. Very nice build. Shall look forward to its completion.

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    1. A lot more was added to it last night and the undercoat is on... More progress soon!

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  4. Oh yeah! Sweet it is! I need to know what the bldg. sign over the entrance door is going to look like and "say"!!

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    1. I have built it up a bit more to look more like a Chinese restaurant facade. Have not decided on the name yet...

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  5. Love it!

    I see lots of red paint on your painting table in the near future :) Name? obviously, Ching Chong Soup Shop, or something in the likes... google "professor genki" vids on YouTube for further into on that topic.

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    1. The walls are already red, getting on with the paint today :)

      PS- the expression "Ching Chong" is incredibly offensive.

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