Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Super Quick Cork Ruins


Too tired to paint minis tonight, but not to make some easy terrain in front if the tv.
Cork ruins are easily the quickest, best looking concrete ruins I have scratch built so far...
The cork tile is superior to foam core for the following reasons:

The edges don't rip if your knife blunts
Already has a texture
Edges look good when broken up
Doesn't warp
Takes Superglue. No drying, no melting.
Relatively heavy and stable
Soft and grippy on the underside.

My City ruins board is looking much further along now than last week!

33 comments:

  1. I spy, with my little eye ... a Felid amongst the ruins!

    Great work there, that's a table that will look splendid.

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    1. Thanks! And yes Jon, he's about 75% finished for that shot you need :)

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  2. That looks good :)
    Nice idea!

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    1. Thanks Mojo, I think I finally have enough city ruins to play a decent game now... But I just can't help myself when it comes to terrain for some reason.

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  3. What thickness of cork do you use?

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    1. 6mm cork flooring tile. It's about $13 for a pack of 6, so cheaper than foamcore too :)

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    2. I have used it before but sometimes i have trouble telling if it's that or the thicker kind in pictures.

      -Eli

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  4. Great stuff! Very effective results from some basic materials. Did you cover the walls in any textured material before the grey paint?

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    1. From the looks of it that's a lightly textured latex house paint, it probably generated the finish by itself.

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    2. Yes, the house paint has some texture but the cork does too.

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  5. Very simple and very effective. Thanks for this post.

    GBS

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    1. Thanks Gavin, I will take some better pictures soon.

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  6. Cool. Now I wonder what the US equivalent of DULUX is?

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    1. Baron: In Calif. Sinclair Paint carries Dulux.

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    2. Thanks Jay... Sure helps to have a professional painter around!

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  7. Nice work, SJ. As asked above, can you give us some idea of the thickness of cork tile used please?

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  8. That's great. Guess I'll be heading to B&Q for some cork board at the weekend!

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    1. Thanks Chris, and glad to hear it!

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  9. Replies
    1. Cheers LA, I think I will make a brown ground board to use with my shanty next next.

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  10. The board comes in 1/8 & 1/4 thicknesses and is generally available at office and art supply stores in the USA..

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  11. Hi, Jacker. Brother you have your mojo in gear! Nice. Another fine SJ idea to be used by me.

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    1. Thanks Jay! I have found the cork is best for rugged looking walls, but really comes into it's own when you crumble off the edges.

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  12. That is really neat and simple, any chance of a few more pictures?

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    1. Seconded, a few more pics to aid those who want to steal the idea would be much appreciated!

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    2. I will take some tonight. This one was just an amalgam of my recent instragram pics of the build.

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  13. Great work SJ, from what I see these look especially good. That texture paint obviously worked perfectly. And yes, cork is totally the way to go for urban ruins... I've even made some halfway decent brick looking ruins with it, though you do have to paint it more.

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    1. Thanks Allison!
      The texture in the paint is some kind of soft element, rather than grit. It seems to get whipped up by rough application. It does work especially well with cork, but it also does a great job of roughing up smooth surfaces (like the concrete barriers I did recently).

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